Business Advice5 min

How Remodelers Can Increase Business with HOAs

Home Owner Associations (HOAs) are the governing bodies of many communities throughout the U.S. – and remodelers can miss out on HOA business if they don’t take the time to study the associations’ design review process.

Any major renovations at an HOA must be pre-approved by a design review committee, which sometimes consists entirely of homeowners and in other cases includes an architect. For example, the McKay's Mill HOA in Franklin, Tennessee, requires a design review of any planned changes to a home's exterior - including trim, wood siding texture and any major color changes.

"Vinyl and aluminum siding are prohibited in our community," says Walter Zeier of Muirfield Association Management, the HOA in charge of the Muirfield Village golf community in Ohio founded by legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus. "We have approved engineered wood products like LP® SmartSide® Trim on previous projects."

Here are some tips for building strong relationships with HOA design review committees:

Be Courteous

An HOA's design guidelines are there for a reason. If the HOA prohibits wild exterior colors like orange and purple, that's the final word.

Be Informed

Design guidelines vary from one HOA to another. For example, an HOA in an historical district might be very receptive to siding with a smooth finish because it matches the existing aesthetic. LP® SmartSide® Smooth Trim & Siding was approved this year for use in a number of historic districts.

Show Professional Credentials

Don't be shy about telling the Board why you're the most qualified person for the job. If you belong to a respected remodelers' organization like the LP® BuildSmartTM Program, that could be a big plus in winning HOA business.

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Business Advice6 min

On the Cutting Edge of Cost-Cutting

There are only two ways to boost your bottom line: increase revenue and cut costs. In this blog, we'll explore innovative ways for builders to cut costs in order to increase homebuilder profit margins - and we'll examine revenue enhancement in a future post.

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