Curb Appeal5 min

4 Tips to Harmonize Your Home’s Exterior and Outdoor Color Scheme

Summer outdoor entertaining season is officially here! Ensure the atmosphere is just right for guests by creating eye-pleasing symmetry among your home's exterior, landscaping and outdoor elements. And much of that eye-pleasing symmetry starts with a harmonious color palette.

One of the best (and easiest) ways to ensure your home's exterior and outdoor color scheme is working together? Buy a color wheel at an art supply or home improvement store to effortlessly reference color cohesion before getting started on any projects (however big or small).

Your siding can be the true focal point of your home’s exterior, and ultimately all landscaping and additional outdoor elements should complement its aesthetic.

Here are the top four tips and tricks to ensure your home’s exterior and outdoor elements complement each other so your place is the star of entertaining this summer.

  • Colors that are easiest to integrate with outdoor focal points like a garden, shed or fencing are the greens, browns and beiges of nature.
  • Grays and muted colors are more versatile than pure pastels and bright hues. You don't have to exactly match plant and paint color with these subtle shades. Fence and shed colors should also be muted.
  • Keep color undertones together. A "cool" house color like blue, green or purple works well with cool plant colors and complementary fence and shed colors. Conversely, "warm" house colors like light yellow, pink or apricot harmonize with "warm" outdoor elements.
  • In some cases, you can match colors that are on opposite ends of the color wheel (like red and green), but they need to be muted shades accented with gray. Otherwise, your home may stand out for all the wrong reasons (and end up looking too much like Christmas).

Pro tip: Beyond paint color, ensure outdoor elements like a shed or fence match the overall aesthetic and quality of your home’s exterior so there’s seamless cohesion on your property.

With these tips, you're well on your way to becoming the star of outdoor entertaining this summer. Best part? Creating color cohesion on your property doesn't have to be an expensive endeavor, giving you curb appeal on a budget-but your guests don't need to know that!

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Renovation6 min

Home Improvement Show Proves Your Siding Project Can Be A Smooth Journey

The popular Lifetime Channel remodeling show Designing Spaces likes to document the home improvement journey to show that it can indeed be a manageable experience. The program recently shared the story of James and Stella, a professional couple in Wilmington, North Carolina, who did a re-siding project that went smoothly from start to finish.

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Renovation5 min
Tips on Re-Siding in Historic Districts

If you own a home in a historic district, you can forget about replacing the existing siding with vinyl. Most historic districts require replacement siding to closely match the original, hence wood (or engineered wood) and brick. Understanding home building regulations based on historic overlays can help eliminate the headache during renovations, so it's important to stay in the know before embarking on the project.

Renovation5 min
Top Four Home Exterior Tips for Fall

With fall just around the corner, it's time to plan how you will ensure your home's exterior is ready for the cooler temperatures while also keeping up with the latest seasonal trends. Not sure where to start? We break down the top four home exterior tips for fall for a little inspiration.

Trends6 min
Using the Right Siding for a Ranch Home

Ranch-style home designs are known for low and wide single-story profiles, large picture windows, sliding glass doors and attached front garages. These close-to-the-ground homes were first built in the U.S. in the 1920s, but they didn't gain widespread popularity until the post-World War II era into the 1970s. As suburbia spread, the ranch-style house became one of America's favorites. The popularity of ranch-style homes waned in the '80s and '90s, but it's making a comeback as younger homebuyers rediscover the ranch's charm-much like they did with bungalows.