How to Keep Your Shed Cooler in Summer

In many parts of the U.S., a shed can get unbearably hot in the summer unless you take steps to ventilate it and prevent the sun's radiant energy from penetrating. Too much heat in a shed is a bad thing, as it can damage liquids like paint or chemicals, sensitive equipment and items affected by humidity.

“We recommend several LP® Outdoor Building Solutions® products that can help to keep sheds cooler in the summer,” says Lenny Stahl, general manager of Dakota Storage Buildings in Milbank, South Dakota. “Both LP ProStruct® roof sheathing and walls made with LP® SmartSide® Trim & Siding feature SilverTech®, a finish-grade radiant barrier that reduces the amount of radiant energy that enters the shed.”

Radiant barriers reflect radiant heat rather than absorbing it, which helps keep internal temperatures down. These product videos will help you learn more about how radiant barriers are made and how they work. 

Stahl adds that it's important to properly ventilate the shed with doors, windows and venting options to keep fresh air moving in and allow harmful things like gasoline fumes to escape. "We recommend either gable vents or ridge vents for ventilation," he says.

First-time shed buyers are often surprised by the breadth of choices in shed windows and doors. Some of these can be just as stylish as those found on a home. 

Here are some other tips for keeping sheds cooler and more comfortable in the summer:

  • Take advantage of available shade – Sheds stay more comfortable if you can place them near sheltering trees or privacy walls.
  • Use lighter colors on siding – This is a given not just for sheds but for any living space that receives a lot of sunshine. The lighter color absorbs less sunlight and transfers less heat to the shed interior, whereas darker colors do the opposite. 
  • Consider adding an awning – In areas where late-afternoon sunlight can be brutal, an awning might be worth the investment.

If you spend a lot of summer time working in the shed or store heat-sensitive items in it, these tips will make it a cooler spot.

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