Business Advice3 min

Installation Advice: Should Wall Sheathing Overlap Foundation?

Whether most of your construction projects use engineered wood, plywood or OSB, proper wall sheathing installation helps protect the home from wind and water penetration. Installing wall sheathing panels is fairly straightforward, yet one question we do see on social media is whether sheathing should overlap the foundation.

Should sheathing overlap foundation? 

The advice when installing wall sheathing is to overlap and install flashing, providing a means to direct moisture away from the foundation. Pros often seal the sill when the wall sheathing overlaps the sill plate. The installation instructions for LP WeatherLogic panels are:

  • When the panel is flush with the face of the foundation, provide a 1/2-inch gap between the bottom edge of the panel and the foundation.
  • Attach approved drip edge when required by code.
  • Apply LP WeatherLogic® Seam & Flashing Tape to seal the top of the drip edge. The tape should extend at least 2 inches past each end and extend at least 2 inches onto the panel face and cover all fasteners used to attach the drip edge.
  • If the fasteners are placed so that the standard 3-3/4-inch tape cannot cover and extend 2 inches onto the panel, use the 6-inch tape or shingle multiple rows of 3-3/4-inch tape so that a layer above overlaps the layer below.

Builder Kyle Stumpenhorst of @rrbuildings recently  constructed a 16-foot-tall building with an irregular foundation, and before he started installing LP WeatherLogic panels he marked reference lines. "We're running our WeatherLogic sheets vertically," says Stumpenhorst. "We won't have a consistent, single line because we can't snap from on our foundation." Check out the full installation process in the video below.

Stumpenhorst said the foundation had some variances. "We don't want to start at the foundation and move up. We're going to mark from the soffit down so we can establish two lines," he said.

The 16-foot-tall building naturally aligned with 4-foot by 8-foot dimensions of the LP WeatherLogic panels. "We laid out all the framing so that we would have very little to no waste while installing the sheathing." In this application, he used a 4-foot piece near the foundation, an 8-foot piece above it, and then a 4-foot piece. For the next section, he installed two 8-foot sections. He finished with the first 4x8x4 combination.

For more quick tips, be sure to follow #LPQuickTip on Instagram. Want to see more from these pro builders? Check out this modern farmhouse build.

 

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Business Advice6 min

Horizontal Property Regimes: How to Help Prevent Row Home Fires

The trend to live near downtown hasn't waned in recent years. However, finding empty lots to construct new houses continues to pose a challenge. Builders are finding solutions within the Horizontal Property Regime (HPR) zoning policy, which allows tall and skinny row homes. However, with as little as six feet between structures the potential for row home fires dramatically increases. Let's take a look at some of the concerns for both builders and homeowners-and how LP® FlameBlock® Fire-Rated Sheathing can help builders meet code.

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Business Advice6 min
How to Install Insulation Sheathing with LP® NovaCore™ Thermal Insulated Sheathing

New to the LP® Structural Solutions portfolio, LP® NovaCore® Thermal Insulated Sheathing is a dual-layered wall panel design to protect structures against heat loss and gain. It combines resilient OSB sheathing with XPS foam to provide continuous insulation without the long-term R-value deterioration associated with other foam insulation products.

Business Advice5 min
How to Engage Design Conscious Construction Clients

With an abundance of inspiration at their disposal, clients may have design goals that exceed their budget. We talked to building professional Kyle Stumpenhorst to get his tips for helping clients achieve their goals without breaking the bank.

Business Advice6 min
How Pivoting to Premium Products Can Reduce Customer Callbacks

With today's hot housing market the last thing you want to do is stop, backtrack, and address a customer callback. In any economy, callbacks in construction cost money and time-time you may not have. Some builders are dramatically reducing customer callbacks by choosing building products that promote greater performance.